July

Rodgersia pinnata

I love to use Rodgersia pinnata to add a little softness to a border that is semi-shaded and not too dry. It bears clusters of bright-pink, star-shaped flowers on dark-red stems from mid- to late summer. The leaves have their own interest emerging a purplish-bronze colour in spring and maturing to green in summer. Some varieties such as Superba or Chocolate Wings have darker edges to the leaves. Rodgersia grows  best in a sheltered, partially shaded site in moist soil, such as in the margins of a pond or stream. 

Rodgersia pinnata
Rodgersia pinnata

 

Rosa Open Arms

Open Arms is a very pretty and pleasantly scented climbing rose. Profusely free flowering throughout the summer and into the autumn, the pink flowers open to reveal golden stamens. It is really a miniature rambler and I love to use it in gardens on a wall, fence, trellis or pillar. It is easy to train and very disease resistant. Best grown in full sun, it will reach up to 5-8ft tall.

Rosa Open Arms
Rosa Open Arms

 

Eryngium giganteum 'Miss Wilmott's Ghost'

I love to use Eryngium to make a bold statement in my borders. Sea Hollies have striking teasel-like flowers - wonderful for cut and dried arrangements - that sit above lovely heart-shaped foliage. Planted in drifts they make a wonderful feature in a sunny border or set amongst grasses. This variety, Miss Wilmott's Ghost, is named after Ellen Wilmott, who, as legend has it, would secretly drop its seeds into other people's gardens. From June to September it produces stunning cones of tiny blue flowers that sit above silvery grey star-shaped bracts, which will pick up the light and almost sparkle on a bright summer's day. It will eventually grow to 30m wide x 90cm tall. I often use other varieties too such as Eryngium x zabelli 'Joss's Eijking' which is a vibrant metallic blue and flowers slightly later in the season or the smaller Eryngium bourgatti that has a deeper cut bract with a slightly softer look.

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Eryngium Miss Wilmott's Ghost